Skull Found at Ancient Greek City Shows Neurosurgery Performed 2,200 Years Ago

The Temple of Zeus Lepsinos at Euromus

Archaeologists carrying out excavations in the ancient city of Euromus in Turkey’s southern Mugla province found a skull with marks indicating that neurosurgery existed 2,200 years ago.

According to the Anadolu News Agency the skull was discovered in a burial chamber during new excavations led by Turkish archaeologist Abuzer Kızıl.

Kızıl said that his team found out brain surgery was performed on one of the skulls belonging to an adult male.

“We believe this surgery was performed due to a headache or a problem that had to do with the skull,” Kızıl was quoted as saying.

Dating back to the fifth century B.C., the ancient city of Euromus is a significant archaeological site with interesting buildings and temples.

Euromus (Εὔρωμος in Ancient Greek) was an ancient city whose ruins are approximately 12 km northwest of Milas (the ancient Mylasa), at Turkey’s Mugla Province.

Probably dating from the 6th century BC, Euromus was a member of the Chrysaorian League during Seleucid times. Euromus also minted its own coins from the 2nd century BCE to the 2nd century CE.

The ruins contain numerous interesting buildings, the most outstanding of which is the temple of Zeus Lepsinos from the reign of Emperor Hadrian.