Greek-Cypriot Professor Produces Groundbreaking Anti-Ageing Serum

chris_toumazou

Greek-Cypriot professor at the Imperial College of London Chris Toumazou found the best way to combat ageing when he partnered with an unlikely collaborator, Duran Duran keyboardist Nick Rhodes.

The most advanced anti-ageing serum ever created, “Geneu” (pronounced gene you), is going right into the DNA, as experts can discover how fast the body degrades collagen and the level of antioxidants that protect against damaging free roots. Developed by one of Britain’s leading scientists, the groundbreaking product reduces fine lines and wrinkles by up to 30% after just 12 weeks of use.

Developed over the last ten years along with the Imperial College, Geneu’s unique “DNA BeautyLab on a microchip” analyzes skin DNA and discovers precisely what it needs. The U+ DNA personalized anti-ageing serum is formulated to provide the ultimate combination and, even more importantly, concentrations of active ingredients, offering dual support to help target wrinkles, elasticity and fine lines, leaving the skin looking visibly improved and hydrated.

The award-winning technology not only identifies skin DNA but also takes into account the user’s lifestyle choices and the damage caused by habbits such as smoking, sunbathing and pollution.

In Geneu’s store in New Bond Street in downtown London, scientists with PhD qualifications welcome customers who then complete a quick lifestyle questionnaire and a brief DNA test with the use of their saliva. Then the tests analyze two factors and the results determine the rate of individual skin-ageing and the customers are supplied with two serums, personalized according to their results. The creams are produced by biochemists at Imperial College, who have also run clinical trials, examining the serum’s efficiency. “If I can get people to accept that a DNA test is nothing to be intimidated about, then we can do tests that determine how well you metabolize certain drugs and also perform tests for breast cancer. We want to bring personalized medicine to retail,” the Greek-Cypriot professor said to Wired magazine regarding his discovery.


LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here