Greek Scientist Designs Ebola Detection Device

ebola708_0United Kingdom Prime Minister David Cameron has agreed to provide 1.34 million GBP for research programs that will help deal with the Ebola virus outbreak. One of the five projects that has been approved and will be funded by the UK government and “Wellcome Trust” concerns the manufacturing of a device that will detect the virus via bodily fluid in 40 minutes.

The mastermind behind this innovative device is Greek scientist Dr. Stergios Moschos, professor of biochemistry and industrial biotechnology at the University of Westminster.

Moschos and his research team began working on the project, entitled “Ebola Check,” in July 2014. The team that includes UK Board of Public Health Vice President, professor Miles Carroll, chief of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases Dr. David A. Norwood and microbiologists from West Africa, applied for funding in August 2014.

Ebola Check will detect the virus 8 times quicker than any other machine available today and will help doctors increase people’s chances of survival.

According to the 35-year-old Greek scientist, the device resembles the one used to detect sepsis in the UK. “It will be simple to operate and suitable for the conditions over there, where they usually have no power,” he said.

Moschos and his team will receive 620,000 GBP (750,000 euros) in order to complete their project. They are planning on offering three devices to Sierra Leone and New Guinea by May 2015, and hope to have built ten Ebola Check devices by the end of that year.


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