Greek Researcher Says Sex Profitable

sex-wageAccording to a recent report released by Institute for the Study of Labor in Germany and done by a Greek researcher, Nick Drydakis, people who have sex at least four times a week, tend to earn higher wages than their colleagues who are less sexually active.

The survey lasted one year, and the sample used was 7,500 Greek households. The data for the Greek Behavioral Study, conducted by the University of Piraeus, the University of Central Greece and the Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, were collected from January 2008 until December 2008.

The survey questioned the participants about the frequency of their sexual activity, whether they were employed or not, the amount of their wages and their work hours per week. “Using two stage estimations we examined the relationship between adult sexual activity and wages,” Drydakis said in a statement.

The results of the study showed that those who are more sexually active, having sex at least four times a week, had higher salaries. The ages between 26 and 50 are those who benefited the most from the link between frequent sex and higher income. The researcher said that this is a correlation and not a cause and effect relation.

As UPI.com reported, Drydakis has a couple of theories for the correlation: one, more sex makes people healthier and happier, and these people tend to make more money; two, higher wages might increase the value and attractiveness of a person who dates.

“In addition, heterosexuals’ sexual activity does not seem to provide higher or lower wage returns than that of homosexuals, but wages are higher for those health-impaired employees who are sexually active,” the study said.

“Contemporary social analysis suggests health, cognitive and non-cognitive skills and personality are important factors that affect wage level, life and job satisfaction, cognitive functioning and reasoning ability. Sexual activity might also be of interest to social scientists, since sexual activity is considered to be a barometer for health, quality of life, well-being and happiness,” Drydakis said.