Greece and France: Blending of Politics

The French elections were eagerly awaited as a means to unity and hope. But while Hollande was winning the election and gathering the entire capital to the iconically republican Place de la Bastille, his prelude to change changed without his contribution. The Greek elections have succeeded in reversing the balance of power.

Hollande is stronger than Sarkozy,
But Athens is stronger than Hollande,
So if you think your prospects are rosy
Then you have failed to understand!

Did Hollande win? I don’t think so. The CAC 40 is collapsing, which clearly demonstrates the fact that France does not exist on its own, and power is not concentrated on a single country’s president but on international factors that are hard, if not impossible, to predict or govern. So, it’s difficult to say if Hollande will be able to persuade the French people to be patient and wait until Merkel and himself (in the very unlikely event that he can persuade her) make interventions into the Greek economy.

Sarkozy, during the debate last week, uttered one monstrous truth: that what we are going through today is not a normal situation.

Hollande, who accused Sarkozy of excusing his own errors and attributing France’s problems to international factors, is now in real trouble himself since his argument is to do exactly the opposite, which is cutting cuts in order to promote growth, and intervening in the Greek/Euro zone crisis, and is likely to prove at least equally disastrous.

Francois might have defeated Nicolas, but Athens has, unfortunately, triumphed over him.