First Greek Policeman in German Federal Police

Charilaos Kyriakidis is the first police officer of the Federal Police Directorate at Frankfurt airport without German citizenship, a Deutsche Welle report says.
The 28-year-old policeman found his new “home” in Germany after serving the Hellenic Police for 10 years.
Kyriakidis is not only the first Greek citizen who serves in the German police; he is the first ever non-German citizen in the Bundespolizei. He is an example of the European Union’s motto ‘Unity in Diversity,‘ a project to bridge the gap between Northern and Southern Europe in times of an economic crisis that seems to undermine European unity.
On February 1, 2017, the young policeman received his appointment certificate from the Federal Police.
Kyriakidis was born in Greece in 1988 and came to Germany together with his family in 2004, where he lived in the Bockenheim district of Frankfurt and went to the Greek school in Griesheim.
After finishing high school, he returned to Greece to become a policeman. He graduated from the Police Academy at Didypoticho and in 2007 he started serving in the Greek police force. However, the love for his wife and the longing for his family pulled him back to Germany in 2016. He successfully completed a suitability selection procedure for police officers from the EU at the Federal Police Academy.
Language is no problem to Kyriakidis as he finished high school in his new homeland. As he told Deutsche Welle, he loves his new life and job: “I want to get to work as fast as I can, I still have a lot to learn, and my new colleagues are very nice and supportive, stressing that the German police philosophy is also a European police philosophy. Kyriakidis reinforces the European profile of the German Federal Police, and his dual cultural ties are clearly an advantage at Europe’s busiest airport.
His duties are passport control and patrols within the airport. As he says, the procedures are very different and admits he has much to learn. When asked to compare working conditions in Germany with those in Greece, his answer was diplomatic:
“I could say that the difference in the organization is obvious. Only that. Not that I feel better or worse. Each country, each place, each service has its good points and bad points. I do not want to go into the process to compare the two services, let alone the two countries. One is the home I grew up and the other is the place I intend to live for the rest of my life.”my remaining years. ”

It should be noted that the German Bundespolizei differs from urban police as it operates in the country’s gateways, borders, airports and stations and is responsible for the protection of the German federal ministries.