Home List By Country Cyprus “Aapi Means Agapi”, say Researchers Presenting Online Greek-Cypriot Dictionary

“Aapi Means Agapi”, say Researchers Presenting Online Greek-Cypriot Dictionary

Greek Cypriot or Standard Greek? Is Greek Cypriot a language that is the same or slightly different from Greek? A research team based in Cyprus has collected over 15,000 words from the modern Cypriot Greek dialect. They made a Greek-Cypriot Greek dictionary online, where users have the chance to search what Cypriot “aapi” means in Greek. (In case you are wondering, it means “agapi” (love in English).”

Christodoulou Kiriaki, Armostis Spyros, Katsoyannou Marianne and Charalambos Themistocleous have collaborated to create this unique platform, where users can search for a word, read its morphological or orthographic variants in Cypriot Greek or Greek and listen to its pronounciation.

These four academics have presented their interesting and innovative work in many international seminars and conferences with great success. The online dictionary has been compiled between 2006 and 2010 for the University of Cyprus.

If you’d like to find what modern Cypriot “arfos” mean, visit the following link: http://lexcy.library.ucy.ac.cy/Lexicon.aspx .

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  • Papaquest

    I am wondering why studying a Greek dialect raises this question “Greek Cypriot or Greek? Is Greek Cypriot a language that is the same or slightly different from Greek?” Is this a middle century mentality by Marianna Tsatsou or not? Just wandering!

  • http://www.facebook.com/spyros.armostis Spyros Armostis

    This is a
    very pleasant surprise! I did not know that there was such an interest in our
    work!

    Just to
    clarify a couple of points: the online database of Cypriot Greek at its present
    state does not include lemma definitions yet (there is a provision for that in
    a future development of the database).

    It provides
    though the lemmas with their alternative morphological (and/or orthographic)
    variants, as well as their phonetic transcription, grammatical category and their
    sound (via speech synthesis).

    As for the
    “Cypriot Greek vs. Greek” question, it is of course not really a
    question: Cypriot Greek is a part of the Modern Greek language, as Cretan,
    Pontic, Tsakonian, Rhodian etc are. Modern Greek language is the sum of all modern
    Greek varieties (i.e. all the above-mentioned varieties and others), among
    which the standard variety is of course included.

    Apparently
    the article writer when referring to “Greek”, she means “Standard
    Greek”. I suppose that she poses that question just to underline her
    amazement about how different Cypriot Greek can be from Standard Greek (not in
    the sense that it constitutes different standard language, which is of course
    not the case).

    Thus, I
    wouldn’t go as far as to accuse the writer of any bad intentions or
    misconceptions; I would just add to what she has written that, apart from the differences,
    the similarities between Cypriot Greek and other varieties of Greek (the
    Standard, Cretan, Griko, Rhodian, Pontic, etc, as well as the older forms of
    Greek, such as Hellenistic Koiné etc) can be equally or more impressive than
    the differences.

    Again,
    thank you for your interest in our work in progress!

  • http://katsoyannou.eu/ Makats

    I was to post a comment about the Greek / CYGreek question, but Spyros come first :) Just one more detail, my name is Katsoyannou, not Koutsoyannou.
    Once again, thank you for your interest in our work.